TUESDAY 30 MAY 2017 COMPLETEMUSICUPDATE.COM
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Spotify has settled the class action lawsuit that it faced in the US over unpaid mechanical royalties. The deal will see the streaming firm set aside a fund worth $43.4 million to compensate songwriters and publishers whose songs it streamed without licence... [READ MORE]
TODAY'S CMU APPROVED: Washed Out, aka producer Ernest Greene, is back with his first new material for four years. New single 'Get Lost' heralds a new record deal with Stones Throw. A slight shift away from earlier material, 'Get Lost' is a woozy disco track, with vocals that drift across its surface. Underpinned by solid drums and bass, the other instruments are allowed to work at varying levels of focus. [READ MORE]
 
LATEST CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review key events in music and the music business from the last week, including the upcoming General Election in the UK and what it might mean for music, a round-up of all the latest Prince legal news, and plans for Festival Republic to introduce facilities for ticketholders to test the safety of drugs at its events. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital. [READ MORE]
 
LATEST CMU TRENDS: The International Federation Of The Phonographic Industry last week published its annual stats report, rounding up the financial performance of the global record industry in 2016. Revenues were up 5.9% worldwide, fuelled by the streaming boom. Reviewing the figures, CMU Trends provides three reasons to be optimistic, and three reasons for pessimism. CMU Trends articles are available to premium subscribers. [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Spotify settles its big mechanical rights dispute Stateside
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS Absolute Label Services upgrades its portal, adds plain English notifications
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
LIVE BUSINESS Huka Entertainment downsizes after collapse of Pemberton Music Festival
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Tidal loses another CEO
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
MEDIA iHeartMedia extends debt renegotiation deadline again
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
EDUCATION & EVENTS Topics confirmed for CMU-hosted conversations at M.I.A.'s Meltdown
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
ARTIST NEWS Gregg Allman dies
Marcus Intalex dies
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
GIGS & FESTIVALS Frank Ocean pulls out of Primavera Sound
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
AND FINALLY... Glastonbury social sharing will use 40 terabytes of EE data
READ IN THIS EMAIL | READ ON THE WEBSITE
MPA GROUP OF COMPANIES - COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE (LONDON)
The Music Publishers Association Group of Companies (MPA, MCPS, IMPEL and PMLL) is seeking a dynamic Marketing & Communications Executive to be the gateway to communications on its work to its members, industry stakeholders and the general public.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
BELIEVE DISTRIBUTION SERVICES - OFFICE MANAGER / ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Believe Distribution Services is looking for an Office Manager / Assistant to join our UK team based in London. The candidate will be managing the day-to-day of the UK office and assisting Believe’s CIO.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
CR2 RECORDS - DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER (LONDON)
Cr2 Records is looking for an experienced Digital Content Manager to manage the scheduling and direct delivery for all our digital releases to all DSP’s ensuring quality control and accurate, timely delivery.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
YOUR ARMY - CLUB PROMOTIONS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Your Army Promotions is looking for someone with a deep understanding of dance music. Your role will involve researching and building relationships with taste maker DJs, database maintenance and reporting back to clients. Some industry experience preferable.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
YOUR ARMY - SPECIALIST RADIO PLUGGER (LONDON)
Your Army Promotions is seeking a highly motivated, hardworking individual with a strong passion for dance music to lead on specialist campaigns at radio.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - DIRECTOR, NEIGHBOURING RIGHTS LABEL COLLECTIONS (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Director of Label Collections will manage the Label Collections team and ensure a smooth running of the department.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - SOCIETY RELATIONSHIP MANAGER (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Society Relationship Manager will manage our client roster at Neighbouring Rights societies around the world.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - SOCIETY RELATIONSHIP MANAGER, LABEL COLLECTIONS (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Society Relationship Manager, Label Collections will the first point of contact for the label societies and responsible for streamlining processes in existing business territories.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Client Relationship Manager will the first point of contact for the client roster and responsible for identifying and signing new client as well as co-ordinate the onboarding.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - LABEL COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Label Collections Assistant will work closely with the Society Relationship Label Collections Manager to ensure delivery of the annual operational plan.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - DISCOGRAPHIES & CLAIMS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Joining a growing Neighbouring Rights team in London, the Discographies & Claims Assistant will research and create detailed, accurate discographies for new clients making sure there’s a completeness and accuracy of ‘historically’ entered artist discographies.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP - ROYALTY ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Kobalt Neighbouring Rights (KNR) is looking for an exceptional individual to assist with our royalty and accounting responsibilities within our Neighbouring Rights department. This is a junior, office-based role that will require a hardworking, self-managing, detail-oriented and organised individual.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
MEXICAN SUMMER/ANTHOLOGY - JUNIOR PROJECT MANAGER (LONDON)
Mexican Summer and Anthology are looking for a junior project manager for our London based office to assist the Director of International Marketing.

For more information and to apply click here.
   
TICKET ARENA/EVENT GENIUS - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER (LEEDS)
Ticket Arena is looking for an experienced Client Services Director to oversee our organisation’s ongoing operations and procedures. You will be a key member of the companies leadership responsible for the efficiency and progress of the business.

For more information and to apply click here.
 
RECRUIT YOUR TEAM RIGHT HERE: 020 7099 9060 or ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
8 Jun 2017 CMU's Chris Cooke moderates a safe harbours session at MIDEM
CLICK FOR INFO
10 Jun 2017 CMU and Meltdown present Where Next For Music?
CLICK FOR INFO
20 Jun 2017 CMU:DIY x Urban Development: Where Labels & Publishers Fit In
CLICK FOR INFO
weekly from 25 Sep 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: The How The Music Business Works Programme
CLICK FOR INFO
25 Sep 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: Making Money From Music
CLICK FOR INFO
2 Oct 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Rights Work
CLICK FOR INFO
9 Oct 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
CLICK FOR INFO
16 Oct 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
CLICK FOR INFO
23 Oct 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: Merch, Live & Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
30 Oct 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase – Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Nov 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase – Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
13 Nov 2017 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO

Spotify settles its big mechanical rights dispute Stateside
Spotify has settled the class action lawsuit that it faced in the US over unpaid mechanical royalties. The deal will see the streaming firm set aside a fund worth $43.4 million to compensate songwriters and publishers whose songs it streamed without licence.

As previously reported, it is generally agreed that streams exploit multiple elements of any one music copyright – so both the so called performing rights and the mechanical rights.

In some countries, the music publishing sector has traditionally licensed the performing and mechanical rights separately through different entities, meaning streaming firms need to ensure that – not only do they have deals in place for both recordings and songs – those deals cover both the performing and mechanical rights of any works streamed.

In the US this has proven challenging, because while there are collecting societies that licence performing rights, there is no one-stop society that represents mechanical rights. In other countries where the two elements of the copyright are licensed separately, there is a mechanical rights society that can provide a licence to cover any songs that are not subject to direct deals between the streaming firms and the big music publishers.

On one level this shouldn't matter because there is a compulsory licence covering mechanicals in the US, which includes a set statutory rate to be paid, so streaming services don't need to negotiate terms and they know from the outset what the mechanical costs will be. However, the compulsory licence obliges the streaming service to alert each and every rights owner that it intends to exploit their work or – where they can't identify the owner – it should file paperwork with the US Copyright Office instead.

Few services did this, mainly because of the big music rights data problem, whereby there is no one stop publicly accessible database to tell you who controls which song copyrights, nor which song is contained in which recording. However, by failing to adhere to the formalities of the compulsory licence, whenever a streaming service streams a song in the US which is not covered by one of its direct publisher licences, it is technically committing copyright infringement.

There have been various lawsuits against various streaming platforms in relation to this technicality, though the highest profile suits were those respectively pursued by songwriters David Lowery and Melissa Ferrick against Spotify. The two suits were ultimately merged into one multi-million dollar class action.

After Lowery and Ferrick's lawsuits had been filed, Spotify announced a settlement with the National Music Publishers Association in the US over the unpaid mechanicals, under which unpaid royalties would be handed over, a compensation fund would be set aside, and the big publishers and the streaming firm committed to tackle the continuing music rights data problem. However, any rights owners who didn't actively sign up to that settlement were still free to join the class action instead.

It's that litigation – another headache for Spotify as it prepares to list on the New York Stock Exchange – that has now been settled, subject to court approval. Like with the NMPA settlement, in addition to the $43 million set aside to compensate songwriters whose songs have been streamed without licence, the two sides in this dispute will also "work collaboratively to improve the gathering and collecting of information about composition owners to help ensure those owners are paid their royalties in the future".

Of course, there has been much talk in recent years about possible solutions to the big music rights data problem, and various projects are now underway, some involving the briefly buzzy blockchain. It remains to be seen whether any of those initiatives – or Spotify's endeavours with the NMPA and the members of this class – actually overcome the issues.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Absolute Label Services upgrades its portal, adds plain English notifications
Absolute Label Services has announced an upgrade to its client portal which, the label services company reckons, makes it "the most holistic and user-friendly data analysis tool available to the music industry".

Absolute has directly distributed its clients music to digital platforms for a while now, providing the labels and artists it works for access to the flood of data that comes back from the download and streaming services via its Absolute Project portal. The portal also pulls in physical product sales and distribution data plus chart, airplay, gigging and social media information.

The upgraded service also offers a thing called Absolute Insider, which aims to help labels and artists navigate all the data available to them. Absolute says that the Insider function is "an intelligent system that is able to monitor developments in a campaign, identify the most significant changes and notify the user in plain English".

Kobalt's AWAL also recently added plain English summaries of the data its platform is crunching, though Absolute reckons its service goes further because it pulls in a wider variety of data and can therefore offer advice on a wider range of distribution and marketing points. Clients can also opt to receive some or all of these updates by email.

Absolute's Simon Wills says: "This latest update makes the Absolute Project portal the most powerful and relevant data analysis tool available to independent artists, managers and labels in the music industry today. We want to ensure our clients have unrivalled access to everything at a free access point; that way we help each other make the best of a campaign".

Stressing the wide range of data his company's portal pulls in for its clients, Wills continues: "We understand that big data needs to be manageable data. We created Absolute Insider so that our partners are kept up to date with the most significant developments of their campaign through easy-to-digest news items and advice. Of course, they can always log on to the web portal if they want to drill down and view things in full detail".

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Huka Entertainment downsizes after collapse of Pemberton Music Festival
The boss of US-based live music firm Huka Entertainment has confirmed that the company has started laying off staff following the collapse of the Pemberton Music Festival.

As previously reported, the Canadian festival, due to take place in July, went into bankruptcy earlier this month, with poor ticket sales and currency fluctuations being partly blamed. As Ernst & Young began work on the bankruptcy, those who had bought tickets were told that they'd have to join the queue of unsecured creditors seeking to get their money back, unless their bank or credit card company provided any guarantees, in which case a refund may be available there.

Huka Entertainment promoted the festival, though the business had been set up so it was basically a supplier to the owner of the event's site, which in turn controlled the Pemberton Music Festival company. It was said site owner, rather than Huka, who decided to put that company into bankruptcy.

Speaking to Billboard, Huka CEO Evan Harrison confirmed that the collapse of the event had had an impact on his business. "We had layoffs to scale down appropriately", he confirmed, before adding that the company still had "a concert-tour team as well as a scaled-down festival team".

Again stressing that Huka was basically a supplier to the festival, he went on: "We, too, are a vendor of Pemberton who was caught off-guard by this".

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Tidal loses another CEO
Perhaps Jay-Z's steaming company Tidal should put the word 'guest' in front of all its senior executives' job titles, that way when they keep exiting they could say "oh, him, her, they were just here for the season".

Actually, Jeff Toig was CEO at the firm for nearly eighteen months, or possibly fifteen months given the chatter that says he actually stood down in March. But he is still the company's third chief exec since it relaunched as a Jay-Z led business in 2015.

Tidal Towers said it wished Toig all the best with his future endeavours, before excitedly stating that "as part of Tidal's continued expansion this year we will be announcing a new CEO in the coming weeks". Oh yes, all that continued expansion, I forgot about that. Definitely best to get a new CEO in with all that planned expansion ahead.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

iHeartMedia extends debt renegotiation deadline again
US radio giant iHeartMedia – which also operates the iHeartRadio streaming platform of course – last week announced an "extension of private offers to holders of its five series of priority guarantee notes and its senior notes due 2021 to exchange such notes for new securities". What an exciting time to be in the radio business! Get that on a t-shirt please.

As previously reported, the broadcaster is trying to restructure its mountain of debt via a proposed equity-for-debt swap. The mega-debts are mainly the result of a $24 billion private equity buyout of the media firm in 2008. As talks with iHeart's money-lenders continued, last month the company raised concerns about its "ability to continue as a going concern", a statement which sparked much chatter about possible bankruptcy.

iHeart has now postponed the deadline for money-lenders to take up the equity-for-debt offer a number of times. Last week a new deadline of 9 Jun was set.

It's thought that most of the finance firms iHeart is busy negotiating with are still holding out for a better offer from the broadcaster. Though iHeart management may well be hoping that the creditors will ultimately play ball, given that it's not really in anyone's interest for the company to go into chapter eleven bankruptcy.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Topics confirmed for CMU-hosted conversations at M.I.A.'s Meltdown
The topics have been confirmed for the three conversations CMU will host at M.I.A.'s Meltdown festival at Southbank Centre, London next month.

Under the banner 'Where Next For Music?', CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke will lead three discussions delving into topics selected by M.I.A. herself, which together explore the process and business of making music in the digital age.

Taking place in the Clore Ballroom at the Royal Festival Hall on the first weekend of this year's Meltdown – Saturday 10 Jun – admission is free and open to all on the day.

The first discussion at 1pm is called 'The Power Of Sound'. Music can instigate a wide range of emotions, but what is it about the science of sound that makes that possible? What draws us to certain combinations of sounds, to certain harmonies? How much is innate and how much is cultural? And how can music affect human behaviour? We will consider the power of sound from a creative, commercial and political perspective. How can music be used to communicate, to affect how someone consumes, or even as a tool of torture?

The second discussion at 2.30pm is called 'The Political Artist In The Social Media Age'. In a period of increasingly polarised politics, should artists seek to be more political? And if so, how? Through their songwriting, videos and alliances, or by simply speaking out? Can musicians really change public opinion? Can political activity impact on an artists' own brands, in a positive or negative way? And do the digital platforms that give artists a direct channel to their fans help or hinder? We will consider the political influence of artists, the challenges of the echo chamber, and the power of the platform owners.

And the final discussion is called 'Music & The Machines'. The industry is increasingly relying on big data and AI technologies to dissect and classify songs and recordings, to power recommendation services on the streaming platforms and music identification systems like Shazam and YouTube's Content ID. But how do these technologies work? What do they tell us about music and the way we consume it? And can the machines use what they learn to become the music makers of the future? We will analyse how the leading technologies work, and what they tell us about music and music-making.

Details of who will be joining each of these conversations will be announced soon. For information on everything else taking place during M.I.A.'s Meltdown festival, click here.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Approved: Washed Out – Get Lost
Washed Out, aka producer Ernest Greene, is back with his first new material for four years. New single 'Get Lost' heralds a new record deal with Stones Throw.

A slight shift away from earlier material, 'Get Lost' is a woozy disco track, with vocals that drift across its surface. Underpinned by solid drums and bass, the other instruments are allowed to work at varying levels of focus. Some percussion elements sound completely sharp, a decayed piano runs throughout, and a saxophone solo appears like the recording has been cut up and played back through a wall.

The track's video, directed by Harvey Benschoter, adopts a complementary cut up and otherworldly feel. Watch that here.

Stay up to date with all of the artists featured in the CMU Approved column by subscribing to our Spotify playlist.

Gregg Allman dies
Gregg Allman, best known as keyboardist and singer in the Allman Brothers Band, the outfit he co-founded with older brother Duane, has died aged 69. The musician had been forced to cancel various tour dates in the last two years due to ill health.

A statement on Allman's website this weekend read: "It is with deep sadness we announce that Gregg Allman, a founding member of The Allman Brothers Band, passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia. Gregg struggled with many health issues over the past several years. During that time, Gregg considered being on the road, playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans, essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times".

Allman's long-time manager Michael Lehman paid tribute, adding: "I have lost a dear friend and the world has lost a brilliant pioneer in music. He was a kind and gentle soul with the best laugh I ever heard. His love for his family and bandmates was passionate as was the love he had for his extraordinary fans. Gregg was an incredible partner and an even better friend. We will all miss him".

--------------------------------------------------

Marcus Intalex dies
Drum & bass producer Marcus Intalex, aka Trevino, has died. He was due to play Soul:ution nights in both Manchester and London this weekend.

His label Soul:R confirmed the news, posting on Facebook on Sunday: "It's with heavy hearts and great sadness that we have to announce that Marcus passed away this morning. Thanks for the kind words so far and we appreciate the privacy and respect shown for his loved ones and friends at this sad time".

Numerous fellow producers and DJs have paid tribute to Trevino since the news broke, including Gilles Peterson who wrote "shocking to hear of the passing of one of the true greats of UK underground dance culture and production". Meanwhile Roni Size tweeted: "I'm utterly saddened that we have lost a soldier Marcus Intalex, my thoughts are with his family and friends. RIP AND KEEP ON ROLLIN ON".

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Frank Ocean pulls out of Primavera Sound
Frank Ocean has cancelled another festival appearance, this time his set at this week's Primavera Sound in Barcelona. The festival said that Ocean was bailing on his set there "due to production delays beyond his control. The artist has apologised and has reiterated his wish to come to Barcelona soon".

Production issues were also cited when Ocean previously pulled out of his sets at two US festivals, Sasquatch! and Hangout. His next scheduled performance is at the Northside festival in Denmark, which takes place from 9-11 Jun.

Back in Barcelona, Primavera has announced that Jamie xx will now be doing a solo set as part of its Friday programme, which essentially replaces Ocean. The xx are already playing the festival.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

Glastonbury social sharing will use 40 terabytes of EE data
Phone firm EE has said it will be setting up the "most powerful temporary 4G network seen at any UK event" for this month's Glastonbury Festival, where it is the "official technology and communications partner" no less.

All that power is necessary because of all the live streaming nonsense that has become popular on the social networks in the last year. EE reckons that fad means more content will be digitally streamed and shared from Worthy Farm than ever before this month, with 40 terabytes of data likely to be used across its 4G network.

Of course anyone about to live stream their Glastonbury moments to friends back home could just be reminded that said friends would probably be better advised to tune in to the BBC's coverage if they are in any way interested, which will have better sound and less chance of a stupid flag blocking the camera's view. I read somewhere that the internationally recognised hand gesture to communicate all that to a budding Glasto live streamer is a short sharp slap in the face.

Says EE's Mat Sears: "Since EE first launched 4G in the UK, we've worked with the team at Glastonbury to give festival-goers the best possible network experience. A few years ago that meant making sure people could simply post status updates and photos, but with social media continuing its rapid growth – including the addition of Instagram Stories, Facebook Live and Snapchat Stories – those on site now require more data for video than ever before. Our customers will be able to treat their friends at home by sharing their own personal view of all of the awesome stuff that Glastonbury has to offer over our superfast 4G network. We're incredibly excited to be able to help make that happen".

Yeah, can someone slap Mat in the face. I'm joking. No one should ever slap anyone in the face. Just slap their phones into the mud.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE BULLETIN

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletins and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, and advising on CMU Insights training courses and events.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
CMU supports the music community by providing news, business intelligence, training and education.

CMU Daily covers all the latest news and developments direct by email.

CMU Podcast is a weekly dissection of the biggest music business stories.

CMU Premium gives you access to the weekly CMU Digest and CMU Trends.

CMU Insights provides training and consultancy for music companies.

CMU:DIY provides workshops and resources for future music talent.



© UnLimited Media, a division of 3CM Enterprises Ltd

UnLimited Media, Kemp House, 152 City Road, London EC1V 2NX
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

Send press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

Email advertising queries to ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

Email training and consultancy queries to insights@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

publishing@unlimitedmedia.co.uk | complaints@unlimitedmedia.co.uk